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A Tetrad of Lunar Eclipses has started on April14th, 2014. See below for pictures of the event from our members. The next of the Tetrad is on the morning of October 8th, 2014.

The solar event of the year 2012 was the transit of Venus across the Sun. See the below pictures from members as they watched the small black dot move lazily across the face of the Sun. The event was shortened in Arizona as the Sun set as the transit was about half completed. The color of the Sun varies from picture to picture as different filters are used. The various filters are Baader Solar Film, Thousand Oaks glass solar filters, Orion glass solar filters, Ha solar filters, CaK (UV) solar filters and also color eyepiece filters to give the Sun more or less contrast. The type of telescope and orientation of the camera will show Venus on what appears to be different areas of the Sun even though it's not.

The annular eclipse at Lone Rock Campground near Page, AZ was an exciting event enjoyed by folks from all over the world. This location was very near the center of the path of eclipse.

Come back often for updates. Click on  the pictures for a full size view.

Totality lasted over one hour starting at just past midnight local Arizona time.

Photo: Barry Middleton

Even from the light polluted skies of Phoenix, the eclipse was visible.

Photo: Jan Weaver

A tripod and digital camera makes it easy to capture a wide field view of the eclipse. A red Moon with a nearby red Mars was quite a site. (Mars is upper right)

Photo: Richard Bohner

The technique used for this picture is normally used for deep space photos. Separate images taken with Red, Blue and Green filters are combined to create the color photo.

Photo: Robert Mueller

Totality just past midnight.

Photo: J  D Maddy

Nearing completion of the eclipse event.

Photo: J D Maddy

Totality just past midnight.

Photo: Doug Ostroski

 

In case you missed the lunar eclipse in April, there are 3 more total lunar eclipses over the next 18 months. This series of lunar eclipses is called a tetrad. The next eclipse is on the morning of October 8th. It starts at about 2 AM Arizona time. The last two of the tetrad will occur in April and September of 2015. A unique aspect of the October 8th lunar eclipse is that the planet Uranus will be less than a half degree away from the darkened Moon. This may allow it to be seen with the naked eye. The eclipse will occur in the constellation of Pisces.

A compilation of the eclipse

Photo: Doug Ostroski

A compilation of the eclipse

Photo: J D Maddy

A compilation of the eclipse. Mars is upper right.

Photo: Robert Mueller

A Lunar Eclipse occurs when the Moon goes into the Earth's shadow. The picture above shows the reason behind the coloring of the Moon. The Earth's atmosphere acts like a prism and causes the Moon to appear to glow in the yellows and reds.

Illustration: J D Maddy

Second contact occurs when the trailing edge of Venus touches the outer edge of the Sun.

Photo: Tom Narwid

From Arizona the transit was only visible for half its journey as the Sun set before its completion.

Photo: Tom Narwid

Another phenomenon that occurs with transits is know as the Tear Drop or Black Drop Effect. This occurs at second contact and the intruding planet appears to smear as it enters the disk. Atmospheric disturbance causes this.

Photo: Doug Ostroski

The complete transit was not visible from Arizona and it is setting over Mingus Mountain and has first contact with a tree!

Photo: Doug Ostroski

Using a glass Orion Solar Filter gives this appearance in the telescope. This is one of Dave's first attempts at solar imaging.

Photo: Dave Norton

Sunspots above Venus are easily seen as the planet passes by them thru out the event.

Photo: Dave Norton

The nice thing about some astronomical events is that you can see them from just about anywhere. And, light pollution doesn't matter much with the Sun. This picture was taken from Phoenix.

Photo: Jan Weaver

In the midst of all the hoopla with the solar eclipse and the transit, many forgot that there was a Lunar eclipse on the morning of June 4th.

Photo: Pat Seals

First contact is a bit tough as Venus is small in comparison to the Sun's size.

Photo: J D Maddy

Second contact occurs when the trailing edge of Venus touches the edge of the Sun.

Photo: J D Maddy

Mid transit has Venus showing up visually by using eclipse glasses or #14 welding glass.

Photo: J D Maddy

At about 6:45PM, the Sun went down behind Mingus from this location. The transit was just past being half way done.

Photo: J D Maddy

First contact with a Lunt Ha telescope. This scope allows the viewer to see solar flares and prominences along with surface detail.

Photo: J D Maddy

The last Ha picture of the day 3 hours and 33 minutes from first contact shows the flare activity changing a bit.

Photo: J D Maddy

Richard Bohner captured this from his home in Cottonwood.

Photo: Richard Bohner

The clouds moved in for this montage from Wyoming. Taken thru an Orion 102mm Mak with a Kendrick solar filter and a dark yellow eyepiece filter. A Nikon point and shoot camera was used.

Photo: Pat Seals

As with the solar eclipse, viewers were able to watch the transit with a PST CaK telescope that sees the Sun's surface in the ultraviolet spectrum.

Photo: J D Maddy

Using edge detect software, the flares and prominences stand out as well as Venus' second contact.

Photo: J D Maddy

   
   
Pat traveled to Cedar City, UT to capture this eclipse picture.

Photo: Pat Seals

Cedar city was in the center path of the eclipse as evidenced by this picture.

Photo: Pat Seals

The Moon is ready to gobble up a large Sun spot.

Photo: J D Maddy

The Moon has uncovered the Sun spot on the right.

Photo: J D Maddy

First Contact using Baader ND 5 solar film.

Photo: Tim Haggerty

On the way to annular eclipse using Baader ND 5 solar film.

Photo: Tim Haggerty

Doug Ostroski sees second contact from the Page, AZ site.

Photo: Doug Ostroski

Annularity occurs at Page, AZ.

Photo: Doug Ostroski

An eclipse picture may not be unique. But, an eclipse picture with an aircraft crossing is a once in a life time shot. Large Sun spots also dot the surface.

Photo: Ted Cooke

Using edge detecting software, the flares and promineneces come to life at second contact.

   

   

First contact taken with a 60mm Lunt Hydrogen Alpha telescope.

Photo: J D Maddy

Hydrogen alpha (Ha) telescopes allow the viewer to see solar flares and prominences at the edge of the Sun.

Photo: J D Maddy

Second contact occurs when the trailing edge of the Moon touches the edge of the Sun.

Photo: J D Maddy

Third contact occurs when the leading edge of the Moon touches the edge of the Sun as it is departing the eclipse.

Photo: J D Maddy

Fourth contact was not visible from Lone Rock as the Sun and Moon set before the event occurred.

Photo: J D Maddy

Annularity occurs as the Moon is centered as it travels in front of the Sun. As you can see, Lone Rock was in the path's center.

Photo: J D Maddy

Karen Maddy gets into eclipse mode as she snapped this with her Point and Shoot before the eclipse thru the eyepiece of  her 6" Pierre Schwar.

Photo: Karen Maddy

Karen shoots another photo with her Point and Shoot thru her polarized sunglasses. Never look at the Sun directly during an annular eclipse as the Sun can still be 10,000 times brighter than a full Moon. Edited to show the "ring of fire" seen with eclipses.

Photo: Karen Maddy

Club member Dennis Casper shows how to make and use a pin hole device to safely view the eclipse.

Photo: Karen Maddy

Club members Ted and Payton Cooke view and take pictures of the eclipse. Hopefully, Ted took the unique picture of a plane going across the Sun as the eclipse occurred. (See above)

Photo: Karen Maddy

SAC member Bob Christ takes a look thru an Ha telescope as the eclipse enters annularity. The temperature dropped 15 degrees as the Sun was mostly covered by the Moon.

 Photo: Karen Maddy

Astronomer and author Jeff Dershem from Grand Junction, CO uses a small telescope to project the eclipse onto a piece of paper. His latest book "Planets to Pulsars: A Citizen's Guide To the Universe" is now available. It's a great book for novices as well as experienced amateurs.

Photo: Karen Maddy

The eclipse viewers had not only a look at the Sun in visual and hydrogen alpha wavelengths, but also calcium-potassium wavelengths. This produces an image in the blue and ultraviolet. This type of telescope shows different features on the surface of the Sun.

 Photo: J D Maddy

Although the CaK telescope was used for visually seeing the eclipse, here's a representation of what they saw in the telescope's eyepiece.

Photo: J D Maddy

As the Sun neared the horizon, the flares disappeared and the surface detail became more evident.

Photo: J D Maddy

As the Sun neared the horizon, the flares disappeared and the surface detail became more evident.

Photo: J D Maddy

As the Sun became annular, small flares could be seen along the edge of the Sun.

Photo: J D Maddy

A photo montage from Doug Ostroski. Click the picture for a full screen view.

Photo: Doug Ostroski

What if we lived in a multi-sun solar system and the eclipsed sun was a dim white dwarf? This might be what we would see.

Photo Editing: J D Maddy

Nearing second contact using Baader solar film.

Photo: Tim Haggerty

Some surface detail can be see during the eclipse with an Ha telescope.

Photo: J D Maddy

A unique phenomenon that occurred with the eclipse was the Sun's size at it neared the horizon. It appeared to shrink in diameter. The picture on the left was taken at 5:27PM. The picture on the right was taken at 7:19PM.

Photo Montage: J D Maddy

Photo montage by J D Maddy

Photo montage by Tim Haggerty

 

Another montage from Club Member Doug Ostroski.